Writing: Immersed in Revision

Monday, May 27th, 2019

Friday afternoon I broke off from my current writing obsession--revising Bless the Birds yet one more time--to drive to Taos to meet with Professor Sara Beth Childers' "Writing the New Mexico Landscape" workshop at Oklahoma State University's Doel Reed Center for the Arts. After I read from some of my work, including Barren, Wild, and Worthless, which they studied in the workshop, we talked about writing over dinner at Old Martina's Hall in Ranchos de Taos, across from the famous church painted by Georgia O'Keeffe and many others. 

After the conversation with Sara Beth and her amazing students--all candidates for MFAs or PhDs in literature--I was so jazzed that I woke at around two-thirty thinking about the revisions I'm making to Bless the Birds. Normally when I wake in the night, my strategy is to let my thoughts spin out until I go back to sleep again. I do not get up, because then I'm awake and I often don't go back to sleep. 

But Friday night--actually early Saturday morning, the writing was speaking so loudly I just couldn't ignore it. So I turned on the light, got my laptop, and wrote down the two haiku in my head. (Yes, there are haiku in this memoir.) And then I wrote about seeds as a metaphor, and what it means to embrace the end of life when you are the one who will live on. Finally, at about four-thirty, I went back to sleep. 

Saturday morning, I re-read what I wrote and added a few more notes, and then headed off to Taos Ski Valley to meet Sara Beth and the group for a hike. (I got lost in the maze of non-named dirt roads and was late, but that's another story.) We hiked uphill on snow for two miles to Williams Lake, a lovely little lake still buried under deep snow in a glacial cirque. It was a slithery trip going steeply uphill, but the group was determined to make it to the lake. (We gained 800 feet elevation, going from 10,200 feet at the trailhead to 11,020 feet at the lake; my pedometer recorded the hike as equivalent to going up 36 flights of stairs!) 

Along the way, I talked about snow and forests and avalanches (we had to detour around debris fields of not one but two big avalanches), the "wood wide web" of fungal threads that connects trees, how to read the landscape, and other nature things. Oh, and we talked more about writing. (The photo at the top of the post is me talking with part of the group. Notice that the ground is white--we hiked on about two feet of old snow, the remnants of the first generous winter snowpack after many years of drought.)

The Taos Valley all spring green this weekend. We hiked up near the snowy bit at the top of the peaks in the distance. 

By the time we slithered our way back down to the trailhead and I said good bye to Sara Beth and the workshop participants, my head was full of more ideas about my revisions, and my eyes were gritty from lack of sleep. I drove home to Santa Fe and told myself to give revising and my brain a rest. Of course, I didn't listen: I just had to slip those two new haiku into the chapters where I heard them, and that of course led to more revising.

Then yesterday, Sunday, a day I usually give myself a break from writing, I had another idea about the story, so I worked my way through more revisions. And while today might have been a National Holiday, you wouldn't have known that from my schedule, which included four more hours of revising this morning and early afternoon. (I don't think the veterans in my life--Richard and my dad--would mind. They know I think of them every day.)

I finished Chapter 23, which leaves me four more chapters and the Epilogue to revise. The closer I get to the end--of the story and of that chapter of my life--the more urgency and intensity I feel to keep going, the drumbeat of narrative pushing me onward. 

That's what happens when a piece of writing takes on its own life, gaining strength and power: it sucks you in, and it's hard to step away from working with it. This story has been a tough one for me, going through many revisions as I struggled to find the heart of it. It's one thing to write about your life in a way that friends and family who know you or the story are moved.

It's a whole other thing to write the story in a way that anyone will be gripped and compelled to read on. As I revise and go deeper, I mine my personal experience for those universal themes and threads that will draw all readers in. I want Bless the Birds to grip them by the throat and not let them go, so that when they reach the end, the way they see life and its ending is forever changed. 

My aim with this revision is to walk a story about death right back into life and how we live it, with prose that shimmers as bright as the blooming yucca I photographed this morning on my ridge walk above my neighborhood, and dazzles like the claret cup cactus blossoms nearby.

I'm not obsessed, am I? Maybe, but there are worse things to be obsessed about than writing...

Banana yucca (Yucca baccata) in full bloom; claret cup cactus (Echinocereus triglochidiaus) nearby