construction

I live in a small house by choice. I like compact spaces and I like living simply. I also want to be comfortable, efficient with energy and materials, and happy in my space. And after living for almost 29 years with a sculptor who could and did design and build anything, I'm picky about details.

So even though my little house and its companion garage/studio were finished last year, I'm still completing a few projects. Today's was a combination of design and whimsy.

Dawn from my front deck after a "male" rain (an intense but brief thundershower). Dawn from my front deck after a "male" rain (an intense but brief thundershower). Photo: Susan J. Tweit

Last Tuesday afternoon, thunder rumbled ominously, cold gusts whipped up dust-dry soil, and the light went all storm-gray. I stood on the front deck watching streamers of rain approach and debated about whether or not to set out on my usual walk to the Post Office.

New moon framed by utility wires.
My house site before construction. (The boulders are Richard's spare sculpture materials.) The house site before construction. (The boulders--which I saved for landscaping--are Richard's spare sculpture materials.)
Self-portrait in the bathroom mirror: note the pencil behind the ear, a portent. Self-portrait in the bathroom mirror: note carpenter's pencil behind the ear.
My desk in Creek House--the two piles to the left of my computer are Bless the Birds.  My desk in Creek House--the two piles to the left of my computer are Bless the Birds.

Last week was my first full week at home. Monday morning, after the usual contractor consults, I pulled out my memoir-in-progress.

Creek House from the south (the side facing the creek) in the evening sun. Creek House from the south (the side facing the creek) in the evening sun. (The street is to the right.)
Creek House "great room"--living, dining, kitchen all in one cozy and inviting space. The "great room"--living, dining, kitchen all in one open space.
Maple strip flooring reclaimed from an old gymnasium. reclaimed maple flooring
Adirondack chair on the guest cottage porch. (The rock is a weight.) Adirondack chair on the guest cottage porch. (The rock is a weight.)

Eight days ago when I wrote the last post, the sale contract on Terraphilia had fallen apart.

Richard Cabe inflating our brand-new kayak at Frantz Lake, September 2009. Richard Cabe inflating our brand-new kayak at Frantz Lake, September 2009.
Treehouse (foreground) and Creek House with board-and-batten siding appearing. Treehouse, the garage plus with studio above (foreground), and Creek House, both with Craftsman details appearing.

In a month and a day, I'll hand the keys to Terraphilia to the buyers.

The tub-shower enclosure in the master bathroom. The tub-shower enclosure in the master bathroom.

I'm close! So close to completing the finish work on this house that my punch-list lives in my head, not on paper.

Dad with Colin and his little brother Liam Dad with Colin and his little brother Liam last summer
The for-sale sign seen across the front yard just after we had a brief shower of rain this evening. The for-sale sign seen across the front yard with its blooming wildflowers and silky bunches of native grass.

The for-sale sign is up!

The view into the master bathroom with the counter in place. The view into the master bathroom with the new counter in place. It is supported by a "rail" screwed to the wall, and one sculptural steel support.
The first page of the two-page current issue The first page of the two-page current issue
My tiny house this evening from the path along the creek. My new house from the path along the creek this evening.

On evenings with no meetings, events or house guests, all of which have occupied every night this week, I walk to the other end of the block after work to visit my tiny house-to-be.

The Oklahoma Panhandle, between Guymon and Boise City, a landscape that brings new meaning to the word 'level.' the Oklahoma Panhandle between Guymon and Boise City