Local food


Back in the days when I tended an enormous edible garden in raised beds just outside the kitchen door of my former house, I began a practice of saying thanks to the plants as I harvested them. 


"Thank you, squash plants," I would say, "for producing these shiny green Romanesco squash with the creamy flesh." And then I'd add, "Thank you, squash bees, for pollinating the flowers so the plant can produce the fruits we eat." 


First, the writing progress: On April 29th, I started on one more revision of Bless the Birds, my memoir-in-progress, giving it what my writer/editor/fiber-maven friend Deb Robson calls a “French polish.” I’ve been reading it aloud, listening to the story, and doing the kind of detail work that I hope makes the story leap off the page and into a publisher’s line-up.

Last week, a packet of seeds from Renee's Garden, my favorite supplier of easy-to-grow, delicious and beautiful garden seeds landed in my post box, my personal signal that spring is on the way.

It's Wednesday and DIY night on this blog, so here's a recipe!

Weather Report: 22 degrees F, wind howling out of the southeast, no snow yet. Perfect weather for a simple, quick and healthy dinner featuring local winter vegetables and soft cheese. (You can add meat if you want, more on that later.)

My living room in the afternoon--imagine me on the couch with Medusa, the multi-headed lamp, turned on for light. My living room--imagine me on the couch after dark with Medusa, the multi-headed lamp, turned on for light.
Deck railings dripping before dawn.... Deck railings dripping before dawn....

I woke this morning in the darkness before dawn and, as I always do, I first checked the view of the constellations—Orion, my favorite, was barely visible, glittering through a veil of high cloud. Next I checked the outside temperature: 49 degrees F, very warm for dawn at this time of year.

When I go looking for a new read, the proliferation of books is sometimes simply overwhelming. So when I discovered these two indie projects by authors I knew through previous work, I wanted to share them with you.

Part of the kitchen garden at Terraphilia in fall. Part of the kitchen garden at Terraphilia last fall.

The past week was a hard one—one friend lost her adult son and another friend died suddenly. When life hurts, I am comforted by nature and the community of the land, hence this look at two thoughtful books grown with love—comfort food that nourishes mind, heart and spirit.

After last week's post, The Dangerous Power of Thin, I wanted to share two simple recipes. I may have a tangled relationship with eating, but that does not extend to food and cooking.

I love to cook. I revel in playing with the flavors, colors, and textures of fresh ingredients, in preparing food that's healthy and delicious, and visually appealing.

Ruffled red lettuce, mache, and arugula, all from Renee's Garden Seeds. Summer lettuce blend, mache, and arugula, all from Renee's Garden Seeds.
Janisse Ray's powerful call to preserve heritage crop seeds, our food inheritance.
Fresh-picked and fragrant!

Well, not strawberries and basil together, though that would be interesting.

Paris Market Mesclun, a gorgeous and delicious mix of lettuces, other greens and herbs, from Renee's Garden Seeds